Sunday, December 7, 2008

Craftsman Detail: #2

I've already raved about why I love Craftsman architecture. It's all about the little extras. Like here, for example, in this small bungalow. It's a modest house, probably built around 1920 as an affordable family home. And yet, the builders had the design chops to incorporate that wonderful sunburst pattern beneath each of the eaves. It's what Petrea over at Pasadena Daily Photo would call superflous detail.

And it makes me happy every time I pass by.

14 comments:

Virginia said...

I like superflous detail.That's a good one Petrea and Laurie thanks for capturing this little house for us.

Jutilda said...

Yes I noticed the sunburst immediately. I guess back then pride in workmanship was more important than just getting it built. Do you know why so many of the columns are smaller at the top? I'm sure I could look it up but you are so good at that sort of thing.

:~)

Sharon said...

What an adorable little house. I too love the Craftsman houses. I have a friend who lived in San Diego for a period of time in a neighborhood just full of Craftsman houses. It was fun to walk ths area and look at all those little bungalows.

San Diego Farmgirl said...

Craftsman homes make me happy, too. The details are even more fun on the inside, with all the built-in cabinetry, and so many have that neat arch between the family and dining room, or an interesting little window here or there. I bet quite a few of them are in foreclosure in San Diego, Sharon, you could probably get a deal! :o)

Petrea said...

Good one, Laurie (and thanks for the mention)! We both know how hard it is to get a good shot of the Craftsman details. So nice of them to paint it in bright colors for us when they do. This detail might hide a vent of some sort but even so, they didn't have to make it so pretty.

Yakpate said...

I love that palm tree, standing above and leaning toward the house as if lovingly guarding it. Although any neighborhood anywhere would be happy to host this craftsman, the palm tree lets us know that, inside it, the dreamin' is pure California.

The Mamas and Papas could be playing on the tuner, too.

babooshka said...

Apologies for not being around as much- you have read the issues. The style is something you just wouldn't see here, or mainland Europe. If it puts a smile on your face then that's good thing. It is pristine. Strangely it reminds me of dolls houses we have here, and yet e don't have this kind of architecture.

Ken Mac said...

love these houses. Is the Craftsman style the same as Arts & Crafts?

Benjamin Madison said...

The detail is nice and so are the proportions and the symmetry. I also like this photo with the palm on the left echoed by the background palm

USelaine said...

Yakpate sees the palm tree as a guardian, where I saw it as a snoopy neighbor trying to eavesdrop! This house is just my speed, if I could afford it.

Laurie said...

Hi everyone,

Virginia, I thought you would like this little bungalow!

Jude, I'm not sure why the columns are skinny up top... Elaine? Petrea? Keith? Anyone?

Sharon, you'd love to walk around here and in Pasadena, too. Many streets are filled with almost all craftsman homes. It's one of the things that drew me to the San Gabriel Valley.

Farmgirl, I've been here almost a year and I'm still not over all the great details in every home around here: cool built-ins and light fixtures and windows...

Petrea, isn't it funny how hard it is to photograph these houses in their usual muted, dark palette? It's like they disappear into the landscape. (Which, I guess, was a big point of the movement...)

Yak, that is the coolest interpretation of the palm. Same for you, Elaine.

Ken, I use craftsman and Arts and Crafts kind of interchangeably but if I remember correctly Arts and Crafts originated in England and Craftsman is generally used to talk about the way it translated in the US.

Babooshka, I love those English doll houses, too.

Thanks, Benjamin!

And thanks, everyone, for such nice commentary. Til tomorrow.

Vanda said...

What a cute house!

Halcyon said...

That is a nice one!

Keith said...

why so many of the columns are smaller at the top?

I think it's just a design feature common to craftsman homes. Take something mundane like a column or, like with this house, the top of the window frames and the area under the eaves, and add something extra - a little artistic craftsmanship. It's all in the details...