Monday, October 6, 2008

Baranger Studios Details

I recently wrote about the historic Baranger Studios building ,but I neglected to show you its charming little courtyard. I never need an excuse to point out more of South Pasadena's whimsical multicolored red bricks, or yet another type of romantic vintage streetlamp. Isn't this a wonderful setting? (The curlicue ironwork on the fence really sends it over the top for me, but then again it doesn't take much to make me happy...)

In case you were wondering where many of those highly collectible original Baranger Motions ended up -- look no further.

23 comments:

ROSA E OLIVIER said...

Interesting!...and for you...

"love is the one who masters all things."

Mawlãnã Rumi.

Virginia said...

Lovely indeed and I am fascinated with the privet hedge growing through the ironwork. Very neat!

Halcyon said...

Your photo is very nicely framed. Has a new business taken over the building? It looks quite well maintained. I'll have to watch the youtube tonight. It's blocked here at work. :( :(

Tanya said...

Lovely little setting. Wrought iron fencing and lamp posts are 2 of my favorite things!

Dixie Jane said...

I can never get enough of romantic lamp posts or curlicue iron fencing. But it was my thinking that bricks were never used in California due to earthquake possibilities. You have shown us several examples. Charming!

southpasblogs said...

I just discovered your blog today, Laurie. Great pictures. I also have a South Pas blog, but have been posting very irregularly as of recent. I'm glad to see someone is posting from South Pas on a regular basis.

Jutilda said...

I'm a big fan of red brick too, especially when each one is a slightly different color - like the old Chicago brick that now costs a zillion dollars to retrieve and re-use ( this seems to be the same). I like how the shadows are sharply turned into 45 degree angles by the hedges on the left (with a little stairstepping to add a visual bit of interest). The half gate ties in and balances the half set of french doors. Also, the two lamps that when connecting the dots, create a horizontal line. :~)

Hope said...

I love all the wonderful details in your photos. The curliques on the fence are unique and beautiful...I wish someone would cut back the hedge so as to let the fence be seen. But that's just me...LOL!

pasadenaadjacent.com said...

I love those things. Most people talk about the building itself for obvious reasons. I'm just so happy that you dug further. Baranger Motions give my life meaning!

Jilly said...

What a beautiful courtyard garden, love the wrought iron work and the hedge growing thru. And adore those shadows. Lovely photograph.

Trish said...

dixie---one would think brick would no longer be in use here in CA, but alas, many, MANY buildings still use it. Some are merely decorative, attached to the outside of a more sturdy building. Others have been "retrofitted" to supposedly withstand a temblor. The reality is, when a quake hits, the brick, real or applied, is most likely going to come down if it is in a place that takes a direct hit.

In the Whittier quake of 10/1987, I was fascinated to see many chimneys in SoPas were damaged. Not knocked down, but a row of bricks, 7-15 rows down from the top, looked as if the entire row had been pulled out 2 inches or so. The rest of the chimney seemed fine, but the focal point of the shaking had centered on that row. A LOT of folks took out their fireplaces after the '87 quake because of this. Similarly for the Landers quake of '92.

As to the studio, as I recall, the gates were often closed and windows were covered up (as in this picture) when I was growing up in SoPas, so I never paid much attention to the building.

Knoxville Girl said...

What a lovely little garden - I especially like the long shadows of - topiary??

Steve Buser said...

Looks like it could be in New Orleans (except maybe for the red bricks.)

Sharon said...

I like the way the hedge is growing right through the curlicue railing.

Per Stromsjo said...

I agree with Knoxville Girl about those shadows. One of several advantages with this season, I'd say. Depending on where on the globe we're positioned of course.

Mister Earl said...

Bricks: In the 1987 quake, my chimney split on a horizontal line and the top kind of torqued a few degrees. Some chimneys and walls just crumbled. Others just broke in a line, as Trish said. The quake was in October, but the contractor I hired to fix it didn't get to it until March, he was so busy! Now it's reinforced and tied into the attic.

USelaine said...

The hedge seems to be soaking through like a sponge.

My Life In Montreal said...

This photo would be lovely in black and white too.

Gorgeous photo.

Miss Havisham said...

I always wondered about the history of the Baranger Studios. Their work reminds me of the animated shop window displays along Main Street in Disneyland.

Shanna said...

uselaine - What a poetic analogy - the hedge SOAKING through - like a sponge. Thanks for the image.

Laurie said...

Hi all,

Welcome rosa e olivier!

Welcome southpasblogs! (I'll be checking out your site next!)

Halcyon, an optometry group and a CPA are in the building now.

Trish and Mister Earl, I remember the chimneys falling over in Venice Beach during the Northridge Quake. I think I've mentioned this before but all the brick down in Santa MOnica made parts of it look like it had been bombed.

I'm not sure how all this gorgeous South Pas brick is staying up -- and has stayed up -- for such a long time.

Miss H -- yes! They remind ME of "
It's a Small World" at Disneyland! I couldn't think of it, but that is exactly it.

Pasadenaadjacent, I'm crazy about the old Baranger Motions, too.
\
I agree with Shanna, Elaine. Soaking through like a sponge is a fabulous way to describe it.

Thank you as always everyone. Until tomorrow...

Trish said...

Earl---yes---chimneys were a mess after the 87 quake. That is when you started to see the plethora the braces running from the chimneys to the roof that seem so normal now. Funny thing is, they'll still fall, but not into the house, theoretically.

There were a number of walls that came down---a few in Pasadena that were notable, one at Cal State LA that crushed a gal. Bricks spread out, fanning from a building were quite normal.

And---having a contractor take a few months to come fix something was quite normal. Some of them just wanted the shaking to stop before starting work. The initial quake broke a lot of windows, they were replaced. Sunday morning's little aftershock at 4 something am, re-broke them all. (and scared me out of bed!).

Webradio said...

Hello Laurie !
What a lovely little garden !
The long shadows is a shadow of what ???