Saturday, September 20, 2008

In lieu of Wall Street

Though I frequently grumble at the TV while watching CNBC, I'm no economics expert. So, rather than attempt half-baked analysis of the burgeoning financial catastrophe, here's my humble contribution.

Now, I guess we all just have to hold our breath and watch what happens next.

20 comments:

Blognote said...

Thanks for this one, Laurie!!
I think we all need that! I saw that the main stoch-exchanges around the world are shooting uo at this moment, but we will continue holding our breath all the same over the next months! Enjoy your weekend.

Sharon said...

The perfect sentiment for these crazy time.s

Virginia said...

Right on sister! I also like those fine old trees lined up in the sun. Great shot.

Yak Pate said...

Uh... what is the name of the cross street? See, that's the kinda optimist I am... I hope this is the intersection of Hope St. and Prosperity Lane.

You don't have a Lost St. in South Pas, do you?

Gotta go, I have a jar of pennies to roll...

Hilda said...

I'd rather have this too.

Come to think of it, if I didn't have hope, I would've left the Philippines a long time ago — like my brothers and siste and a lot of my friends.

Wayne said...

Those trees have seen it all before. They look great by the way Laurie.

I'm a glass half empty guy and I think this is going to be bad news.

Did anyone see Bill Moyer's Journal last night. That was the most candid evaluation of this mess I have heard so far.

Cafe Pasadena said...

I recognize that corner, Laurie: it's the intersection of Hope & Pray! This shot may have fit better in B & W.

altadenahiker said...

Ye of little faith CO. It's the corner of Hope & Glory. (I hope and pray.)

Mister Earl said...

How many people are living on Hope? I notice that Hope doesn't go all that far in South Pas. Unfortunately, Hope and Mission don't intersect.

I once entered the Pasadena Weekly Mystery Photo Contest. It was the parking lot on Hope behind the pet shop across from Wild Thyme. I entitled my entry, "A Street Called Hope." Unfortunately, the Editor, Jim Laris, was out of town that week. He wrote me a note, now framed on may wall, telling me I would have won if he hadn't been traveling. He said, "Oh the misery. Oh the pain." I live quite a bit south of Hope.

Judy said...

I love the duplication of the right angles in this shot, softened by the slight curve of the trees. It is a symbolic image and hopefully (no pun intended) a statement for our future. :~)

USelaine said...

I wish I could have seen that Bill Moyers show. I hope for economic justice, not socialism reserved for the super-rich.

The picture. Love the color, the towering trees, the white picket fence. And hope.

Julie said...

ummm ... folks ... the STOP sign is on Hope Street ...

Dixie Jane said...

In every crisis it is the last thing that we have, hope. I like everything about that photo. Those trees look healthy and strong. B & W just wouldn't show the storms they have weathered. Like the trees, we have each other and we all need to be, strong, optimistic and filled with hope. Thanks for pointing it out so poignantly.

USelaine said...

Julie, perhaps the Stop allows us to pause and think before leaving Hope Street...

Julie said...

... or we could consider it a mandatory pause to enable us to avoid what is roaring through on the cross-street before we cross over to Hope Street which continues on the other side ... golly I hope your countrymen think deeply prior to making your decision in November!

Laurie said...

Hi everyone,

I find the current financial disaster so mind-blowingly convoluted, complicated and outrageous that all I just have to use hope as a filter for all the information.

I highly suggest everyone take a half hour to watch the Bill Moyers segment Wayne suggested. You can see it here. It's one of the more comprehensive discussions of the events -- with fairly little partisan finger-pointing. Or perhaps it's appropriately equal-opportunity in its finger-pointing. After all, Left and Right have both enthusiastically trumpeted the almighty free market in the last couple of decades.

At any rate, for those of you -- like me -- wanting to get a better grasp of why this is happening, the Moyers show is a nice place to start, in my opinion. Thanks, Wayne.

And thanks all of you for responding to my photograph. This shot is close to my heart. For the reasons you all pointed out.

One thing is certain -- in this new age of globalization, we're all in this mess together.

Jilly said...

Love the sentiments in this post, Laurie. Charming photo too.

Hope said...

The trees are standing tall and strong throughout all .... perhaps an encouragement as well as the sign. I , also, like this post for obvious reasons....signed Hope

-K- said...

Living so close to hope has obviously done those trees a lot of good. They look fantastic.

Trish said...

growing up I always wondered why our friends, the Hopes, did not live ON Hope St in SoPas.

Alas, I have grown up and understand streets and names do not have to merge.

It is a small, but beautiful street in SoPas. Actually, there are very few ugly streets in SoPas. That is one of the wonders and enjoyment of wandering around the small town.