Saturday, July 7, 2012

Steampunk Border

People throw around the term steampunk, but just below Raymond Hill's north side is a great example of the real deal. Pasadena's Department of Water and Power Glenarm Steam Plant was built 104 years ago when our region was just finding its industrial groove. You've probably admired the elegant Depression-era fountain and iconic building at the very border of South Pasadena.

Now under the umbrella of Pasadena's Integrated Resource Plan, the Glenarm Power Plant is slotted for updates and renovations, while supposedly preserving the historic integrity of the buildings and fountain. (That fountain was designed to function as the cooling tower for the generating equipment. How's that for an example of bygone ingenuity?)

7 comments:

Michelle said...

Wondered what happened to your post today. Glad it's up now!

I've always loved that fountain and old building on Fair Oaks. I hope the renovations don't destroy the history of the place.

Anonymous said...

I LOVE this picture! That collection of smokestacks is such a good subject.

Green Guy said...

Gorgeous shot. Glad for these border pics.

Judy Williams said...

I am mad for this. The monotone with pops of red!! Just think that was built 4 years before your house, so it could have power. COOL!!!

alex said...

quite the aura surrounding that plant. great photo.

Trish said...

I grew up in SoPas, never realizing the significance of that property until I was an adult. I felt I grew up in suburbia, not industrial gunk. However, right there, on the "backside of Raymond Hill" was a power station. Having grown up in the Altos, I never saw overhead power lines in my neighborhood. Power was just magic, unless it was out. As a child, I could cajole my parents into driving by at night to see the fountain lit up in beautiful colors when we were out to do anything.

Great capture of the station Laurie!! I too hope the revamp doesn't destroy what I grew up with, but understand only too well why this needs to be done.

Laurie said...

Thanks, everybody!