Saturday, September 3, 2011

comfort of open spaces


Autumn

Oh the sight of a tall shedding tree:
to us it has grown to the limit of the sky
that breaks through its branches.

Filled with summer, almost thoughtful,
its faithful head seemed deep and thick.
But now its bones cross the sky like streets.
And the sky doesn’t know us.

At best, if we tried to warp
like birds through new openings,
we would be denied by the right of space
to consort only with worlds.

Like flags, the waves we feel in our seams
seek the connection and comfort of open spaces—


--Rainer Maria Rilke
translated by James Burnham

8 comments:

Michelle said...

I love this.

Judy Williams said...

I'm with Michelle. The lines and shadows are really nice. As much as I hate smoking, there is just something about the person/cigarette duet that always works in a photo. What I don't think people realize is how much you can get from a black and white photo. Instead of being bombarded with alluring colors, you can stop and really take notice of the shapes, the textures, the subtle whites to grays to blacks. Nice work, my dear.

Anonymous said...

I want a copy of this one. Wow.

Anonymous said...

Looking forward to the reception at Charlie's Coffee House to meet you and view your black and white photos. Has a date been set?

A photo on my favorite street.

Auntie S said...

I like the poem by Rilke and the black and white photo very much.

Sycamores are my favorite; there are several giants in our front yard. Some people don't like them.

"Oh the sight of a tall shedding tree:

The gardener Matthias says, "UGH"


"But now its bones cross the sky like streets."

I look forward to seeing this new image; In winter I always see skeletons marching across the grass.

More Rilke, black & white photos!

Sally said...

You're having a show at Charlie's?

Shanna said...

Be sure to let me know bout the show!

Laurie said...

Thanks, you guys!

I hadn't mentioned the show yet because we haven't settled on the date. It will be bery soon, though. Stay tuned! Oh, and although the Quarterly mentioned it as a black and white show, it will include both color and b&w.