Wednesday, April 28, 2010

Details, Details...

I couldn't help but notice the iron curlicues on the upper window. Do you think they were originally added for the sole purpose of casting whimsical shadows in the late afternoon sun? Me too.

13 comments:

Judy Williams said...

Curlicue (also curlycue) is one of the best words ever!!!

Dixie Jane said...

This is just simply, a pretty picture. I love everything about it.

Anonymous said...

I agree. This is lovely

Sumi Ko said...

Yup!

Mike said...

I know exactly where this is. What a great use of the light because I've never thought if it as particularly noteworthy. Great eye as always, laurie.

Pasadena Adjacent said...

whimsy is a good thing

ryanpainting said...

I've repainted this home so I have tickled those curly-ques. Homes in SP have such unique character. As you look closer at Spanish and also Craftsman homes here the more find these sort of details. Many of the layers on Craftsman woodwork were made just for shadow effect. I'll get called to highlight areas that are already highlighted with shadow and light. Really fun to see the effect throughout the day. I'll add my vote to the architects' intention on this one. Only the shadow knows...

Judy Williams said...

How cool that the painter of that building commented. Blogs rock!!

Laurie said...

Okay, Ryan, this is the second home I've featured on my blog that you have painted. Cool! In fact, email me so I can have your info when MY house needs repainting...

I agree, Jude. Blogs truly do rock.

Thanks for the curlicue commentary today, gang. Until tomorrow...

Cafe Pasadena said...

I appreciate the mix of colours in this.

Fyi, there will bee a local blogger get together on 5/8. Details to follow shortly

TheChieftess said...

Regardless of the shadows...those curlycue/curlicue thingys are a very cool detail!!! The shadows are definitely an added plus!!!

Gunn said...

Again, beautiful details in your photo.
Very pretty!

Anonymous said...

Beautiful picture of our home. I think the curlycues are meant to hold flowering pots; they are part of the original blueprint design. They do cast interesting shadows.