Friday, February 13, 2009

Post: Modern

The neighborhoods in South Pasadena's hills sprung up later than the rest of the city. And like a cocky teenager who defies his parents by growing his hair out and dying it blue, this enclave happily rebels against the older neighborhoods below. Above, you'll find all kinds of modern architecture dotting a landscape of ubiquitous contemporary California ranch style houses. There are wonderful examples of mid-century modern, Brady Bunch chalet and earthy 70s split level, as well as a few boxy 80s glass and stucco palaces.

Here, I snapped a shot of a cool late 1960s modern chandelier hanging in a big picture window. What was once brand new is now its own 20th Century modern classic. (If I squint, I can visualize a little Rothko in that textured wall -- a little Miro in the orbs and the tree branches...)

18 comments:

Judy Williams said...

Totally Zen feeling. Like a natural triptych with the overlay of the bare tree branches on the right, and one or two leaves for a pop of reddish orange. So loving the geometry of this. On a spacial level, it's perfect.

Sharon said...

Cool photo. Very zen like.

Susan C said...

And a little Mondrian in the blocks of color.

altadenahiker said...

this composition is so smart and so soothing.

LSaeta said...

How on earth did you ever find this shot? Wonderful!

Yakpate said...

This is one of the best in a long record of fabulous shots. The angles may be Zen, but the colors are pure exhilaration. I love the way you see the world!

Palm Axis said...

I'm over at Pasadena Adjacent now

Good word play. This is why I spend my time in the hills. ( I once saw a Rothko above a chintz couch, good art can't overcome a bad couch)

Trish said...

One of the nice things about the Altos is that different developers built different houses up there in the 60's and into the 70's. So the Altos doesn't look like some of the Inland Empire tracts that all look the same, like cookie cutter houses one, right after the other, after the other. There *are* a few that are similar in the area--- a buddy of mine had the same house, situated a little differently two doors up from us. Except for trying to walk out the back door that wasn't in his house (but was in mine), I could find just about anything there. But that wasn't the case for most of the rest of the houses on the hill.

& L Saeta---stop and look, carry the camera, pay attention...it is amazing what you will see if you slow down a little. Laurie's good at it!

Margaret said...

Very nice composition. Well done.

Virginia said...

I like this a whole lot. I'm a 20th modern classic myself-ha! It's right up my allee! :)

V

Petrea said...

Love this! What a great shot, I love the way you framed it. We had those lamps in our house when I was growing up. Classic.

-K- said...

wow.
that's what I'd call a triptych.
And a very nice one at that.

Stéphane Kardos said...

this composition is very nice, I love the strict lines against the organic tree branches. And the complementary colours. Vibrant!

Steve Buser said...

You did the designer some good justice with your shot. Just the kind of image he/she wanted seen.

dbdubya said...

I've looked at this several times and it keeps changing like one of those optical illusions that appears to be different things to different people. I know what it is, but it keeps changing on me! Great work, Laurie.

Laurie said...

Wow, everyone. Thanks so much for the kind words! I am particularly fond of this shot, so I really appreciate that you like it.

Until tomorrow...

Kim said...

I'd buy a print of this if you had it, Laurie. So well seen and I love the colors, shapes, and textures. Way cool. Isn't it fun what you see out walking/diving around looking through a camera lens?!
-Kim
Seattle Daily Photo

Laurie said...

Thanks, Kim! I do believe the lens acts as a kind of magical interpreter. Life funneled into your eye and transformed into something other than just the sum of its parts. I'm so glad you like this one. It's a favorite of mine.